The Rise and Fall of Natios

The Rise and Fall of Natios

The world is an unstable place, this book argues. Yet, there are certain patterns and variables that concurrently also make the world somewhat predictable; more precisely, cyclical. All seven of the world's global recessions since 1980, for example, emanated from the United States. In the years to come, the slow growth in China, will have a whiplash effect on the rest of the world too.

Ruchir Sharma, a regular contributor to Newsweek International at one state, is a sharp and astute observer. He gets India, China, and many other countries right. For example, China has grown by 3200 per cent since its Open Door policy in 1979. Invariably, China has made a leap of 30 places up the UN Human Development Index. The same goes for South Korea, also a 'jump' of 30 places based on the economic trajectory it enjoyed from the 1950s onwards. In contrast, India is languishing at the bottom end of the league, at nearly 135 places, out of a pool of 170 developing countries.

Indeed, this book is a must read; especially those interested in the interstices between international relations, finance, and global economy. The anecdotes on Wall Street, the Savannah in Africa, are all apt. More importantly, the world has become more, not less, nstable since 2008s, so much so that one can speak of "deglobalization"; as marked by the rise of populist leaders like Donald Trump and Nigel Farage.